Fourteenth Meet Up @ Sydney

27 04 2016
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To do our civic duty

25 05 2015

Life and Deaf

Jury Duty 5

My friend Gaye Lyons wants to serve on a jury. I don’t.

Lots of people are like Gaye and lots are like me. This is true of hearing people too.

Whether or not we actually want to do it, deaf people should have the right and the responsibility to do their civic duty, alongside hearing citizens. This means that when people like me are called for jury duty, we would do it even though we might not want to, because that is our duty as citizens.

But in Australia the law, or the traditional interpretation of the law, prevents deaf people from serving on a jury. It prevents us from doing our civic duty. It does not treat us as citizens equal to others.

This is essentially what the issue of deaf people and jury duty is about: whether deaf people should be treated as equal citizens and allowed to…

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50 Awesome Quotes by Neil deGrasse Tyson

15 03 2015

Fantastic quotes by a smart fella.

TwistedSifter


Neil deGrasse Tyson (born October 5, 1958) is an American astrophysicist, a science communicator, the Frederick P. Rose Director of the Hayden Planetarium at the Rose Center for Earth and Space, and a Research Associate in the Department of Astrophysics at the American Museum of Natural History. Since 2006 he has hosted the educational science television show NOVA scienceNOW on PBS.

Tyson attended Harvard University, where he majored in physics. He was a member of the crew team in his freshman year, but returned to wrestling, eventually lettering in his senior year. Tyson earned a Bachelors of Arts in physics from Harvard in 1980 and began his graduate work at the University of Texas at Austin, where he earned a Master of Arts in astronomy in 1983. In addition to wrestling and rowing in college, he was also active in dancing in styles including jazz, ballet, Afro-Caribbean, and Latin Ballroom…

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Wrong way! Go back!

21 11 2014

Life and Deaf

Wrong Way Go Back Sign

I’m worried. I am very worried. You should be too.

Many national organisations representing people with disabilities are about to lose their funding, including Deaf Australia, which represents me.

If this happens, Deaf Australia could be forced to return to what it was in the 1980s, a small volunteer-run organisation with no funds. But in the 1980s volunteering was a strong part of our culture.  The world is different now. People volunteer a lot less.

What will life be like for us if this happens?

Not good. Not good at all.

The price of liberty, they say, is eternal vigilance. The progress our representative organisations have made for us over the years has been about our human rights, our liberty.

For deaf people, the National Relay Service, new and improved interpreting services, captioning, Auslan/English bilingual education and early intervention; all these things give us access and the freedom to make…

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Wrong way! Go back!

20 11 2014

Wrong way! Go back!.





Redirecting anchor links on web pages

22 09 2013

ffeathers

I’ve recently discovered that it’s not possible to do a server-side redirect for anchor links on web pages! The reason is that the anchor part of the URL (the part containing the “#” and anchor name) is not sent back to the server. Not ever!

This is what happened to me recently: I had a long document, presented in one long web page. I decided to split it into two pages. A number of the headings had IDs which act as anchor links, and we know that external documents link to those anchors. I could fix any incoming links in our own documents, but not in the unknown number of documents out there on the world wide web.

This is a prime case for a redirect, or so you’d think.

An example

Let’s say I have a page called “Ice Floes“, and  I have the following HTML in…

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Righting a Wrong

25 06 2013

The Rebuttal

imageI have just had the enormous privilege of attending the DisabilityCare Conference. The Conference was a fine mix of information, celebration and drum beating about all things disability. I was privileged to be able to mingle with Australia’s elite disability activist. Among them were the Bolshy Divas – they are a group of elite disability activist, all females. I was very proud recently to have been anointed a Diva. They call me the Diva WAD. Because I do not want to offend anyone’s sensibilities I shall leave the WAD part for the reader to work out.

The Conference provided fabulous information about the NDIS. Of course we all know the name for the NDIS is now DisabilityCare. It is a name that many of us loath, including me, so I will continue to use the term NDIS. The information pertained to the structure of the scheme, what it will provide…

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